11 thoughts on “Linda Acaster – Not Your Average Romance Writer!

  1. Thank you, Sharon, for the invitation to chat. I have brought coffee so if anyone wants to ask a question I’ll be popping in and out today, hunting the biscuits. Or should that be pemmican cakes? LOL!

  2. Fascinating account. It can make a real difference to a book when the background is thoroughly researched. I have read Beneath the Shining Mountains and was swept along by the story, but came out with a feeling of deeper understanding for a culture I had known very little about.

  3. Thanks for dropping by, Penny, and for your thoughts. Glad you enjoyed the novel. I think this ‘deeper understanding for a culture’ is what motivates most Historical novelists. The eventual story, or stories, are first viewed as a vehicle to convey what it was like to live in the culture, rather than it be merely window-dressing to bolster the story. I also think this applies to any historical period, Dark Age to Regency, or even WW2.

  4. I read ‘Beneath the Shining Mountain’ some time ago and remember being impressed with Linda’s profound depth of knowledge of the culture of the native Americans of the time. An intriguing romance, with much to offer readers who don’t normally read the genre, too. Thanks for sharing this with us, Sharon.

    1. Good of you to call in and say so, Stuart. I’ve always felt that Romance wasn’t just a connection between two people, but with the landscape and the ethos – Romance with a capital R!

  5. Fascinating details, Linda. The tragedy was that many of the European settlers who displaced the native North Americans were fleeing near-starvation, oppression and injustice in their own countries. They won because they had guns instead of arrows, and subsequently justified their invasion by denigrating and obliterating native culture..

    1. Do we ever truly see a situation mirrored towards ourselves? I always think the tragedy was that, for the most part, native peoples considered if you weren’t a known enemy honour decreed that you should be treated as a friend – the exact opposite to European thinking. Thanks for leaving a comment, Madeleine.

  6. Fascinating details, Linda. The tragedy was that many of the European settlers who displaced the native North Americans were fleeing near-starvation, oppression and injustice in their own countries. The won because they had guns instead of arrows, and subsequently justified their invasions by denigrating and belittling native cultures.

  7. I love the etiquette things like not talking to the mother-in-law and the sewing info. Really fascinating stuff. Thank you for posting.

    1. You’re welcome, April. As I mentioned at the top of the blog, what fascinated me was the ‘how did they?’ aspect …hunt bison with a bow and arrow? These animals stand nearly two metres at the shoulder, can run at 35mph and are surprisingly agile. …how was part of a bison skin transformed into a shield which could stop a musket ball? I think if a writer ever loses their inquisitive thought process, what is there to light the imagination?

Would love to hear your thoughts!

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